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Walking for Water

"Bictor is a pretty typical eight-year-old: he races to get his chores done, finds math challenging and likes to play with his friends. One day, the new school teacher introduces Bic and the other students to the idea of equality between boys and girls. Bic has never really thought about it before, but he soon begins to notice the disparities around him. Like all the older girls and women in their Malawi village, his twin sister, Linesi, now walks the long walk to the river to collect water for the family. Now she can't go to school anymore. It's just the way things have always been.

Small but Mighty: Why Earth’s Tiny Creatures

"The lion may be king of the jungle, but there are plenty of fascinating tiny critters that are critical to the survival of our planet. From frogs as small as quarters that indicate the health of entire ecosystems, to crayon-sized millipedes that recycle dead plants into vital nutrients for soil, Small but Mighty explores the ways that small creatures help our environment thrive. Each spread is packed with STEM content, including descriptions of each creature, fun facts, and real-life size comparisons.

Meet David Suzuki

"As a young boy, David Suzuki loved spending time in the glorious British Columbia outdoors with his father. The racist policies against Japanese Canadians during World War II put an abrupt end to that when David's family was sent to a Japanese internment camp in 1942. After the war, the Suzuki family was forced to leave B.C., settling in Ontario. David immersed himself in learning, earning a PhD in zoology, becoming a professor, and eventually taking his love of science education into the public sphere with his shows on CBC radio and television.

Amazing Black Atlantic Canadians

This fascinating, full-colour illustrated book features over 50 amazing Black people from Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador, sharing their incredible stories and accomplishments, past and present. Among these amazing Black Atlantic Canadians are people who saved lives, set sports records (Delmore William “Buddy” Daye), achieved international superstardom (Measha Brueggergosman), made change in their own neighbourhoods (Quentrel Provo), overcame injustice (Viola Desmond), and enacted many other inspiring deeds of courage and perseverance.

A Terrible Tide

"Based on the true story of an earthquake that shook Newfoundland's Burin Peninsula, [this book] tells the tale of this forgotten disaster from the point of view of a young girl whose life is turned upside down. November 18th, 1929. In her small village in Newfoundland, Celia is setting the table for her 13th birthday celebration when the house starts to shake. It's an earthquake, rumbling under the Atlantic Ocean.

My Indian

"In 1822, William Epps Cormack sought the expertise of a guide who could lead him across Newfoundland in search of the last remaining Beothuk camps on the island. In his journals, Cormack refers to his guide only as "My Indian."."

The family way

Tulia May lives in rural Nova Scotia with her mother, who works in the laundry of the nearby Ideal Maternity Home. It's a place where unwed mothers can discreetly give birth, a place where adoptions by rich Americans can be quickly arranged. Tulia doesn't think about the workings of the home much; mostly she hates being roped in to helping scrub the endless diapers. Her friend Finny Paul has suspicions that the home is holding sinister secrets--the worst being that unadoptable babies are being buried in butterboxes--but Tulia thinks he's being ridiculous.

Elvis, me, and the lemonade stand summer

It's the summer of 1978 and most people think Elvis Presley has been dead for a year. But eleven-year-old Truly knows Elvis is alive and well and living in her trailer park. It's a busy summer. Though Truly's mother is constantly drinking, smoking, and juggling new boyfriends, Truly is determined to raise money for herself through her lemonade stand, and to prove that her cool new neighbour is the King of Rock 'n' Roll. And when she can't find motherly support in her own home, she finds sanctuary with Andy El, the Salish woman who runs the trailer park.

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